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Friday Foster Interview

 

1) HOW DID YOU GET STARTED FOSTERING FOR WAGS AND WALKS?

My girlfriend, Emily, had been volunteering with Wags and Walks for a while, and had told Lesley about her love of big dogs. About 8 months ago, Wags and Walks rescued a beautiful Mastiff named Molly, and we were all set to foster her, but she got adopted before we even had a chance to take her home.

We were a little disappointed (especially Emily, who I think was secretly planning to adopt Molly), but now Lesley knew that we were ready and willing to foster dogs, so waited patiently for the next big dog in need. Imagine my surprise when Emily brought home our first foster -- a tiny 5 pound toy poodle named Alvin. At first, Emily thought that it was some kind of joke (she never saw herself with anything smaller than a 50 pound pooch), but a week later we had adopted him. We've been fostering ever since.

2) HOW MANY DOGS HAVE YOU FOSTERED, AND WHO WAS YOUR FAVORITE (WE WON'T TELL THE OTHERS!)?

We've fostered fourteen dog, which seems crazy since we've only been fostering for 8 months. Obviously Alvin was our favorite, but we also fell totally in love with a sweet pitbull puppy with an adorable overbite named Harlow. It was pretty hard to let her go when she got adopted, but she went to a great family who's crazy about her, and we've actually watched her when they're out of town.

3) WHAT HAS BEEN THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE WITH FOSTERING?

There are the little challenges like working with untrained puppies, or tiring them out so that they'll go to sleep, but those really just come with puppy territory. In reality, the hardest part is definitely letting the dogs go when they get adopted.

4) HOW HAS FOSTERING AFFECTED YOU?

I never had pets growing up, and while I've always liked dogs, I've never really been a "dog person". After adopting Alvin, and fostering 13 other amazing dogs, I can safely say that's changed. My co-workers joke about me being the dog whisperer, because more often than not I've got at least two dogs following me around all day at the office. It's been a lot of fun not just getting to know our amazing fosters, but also meeting the people who adopt them, and connecting with others over our shared love of dogs.

5) WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST SURPRISE ABOUT BEING A FOSTER PARENT?

How quickly we ended up adopting one of our fosters. We'd talked about adopting before we started fostering, but didn't know if we were ready, and certainly didn't expect to adopt the tiniest toy poodle, but when we met Alvin we just fell in love.

6) WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONETHINKING ABOUT FOSTERING?

Just do it! I think fostering is a great way to test the waters if you're thinking of adopting but aren't quite ready to make the commitment yet, and it's such an incredible gift to a rescue in need of a good home.

 

How to Provide Basic Emergency First Aid to Pets

Happy April Wags and Walks followers! April is pet first aid awareness month and all pet owners should take a second to review this helpful info-graphic (below) that Vet Depot put together that provides tips for all types of emergency pet situations.  Click here to read more the entire article.

Also, don't forget that on Wednesday, April 16th Wags and Walks is hosting BINGO night at Hamburger Mary's in West Hollywood!   Suggested donation is $20 at the door which gets you 10 BINGO cards and the chance to win some amazing prizes!!  All donations benefit Wags and Walks Rescue.  (Hamburger Mary's is located at 8288 Santa Monica Blvd, West Hollywood 90046)  Hope to see you there!!

basic-emergency-first-aid-for-pets-infographic (1)

Love At First Lick

Happy Friday Wags & Walks Followers! The below video has caused a pretty big social media stir over the past week and has received over  48 MILLION VIEWS on YouTube (which is INSANE!!)   A few parodies have popped up since the original went viral but I have to say, Jimmy Fallon wins in our book!   Enjoy and have a great weekend!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IpbDHxCV29A

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NaGAkU_K_EY

Old Dog, New Home: Benefits of Adopting a Senior Pooch

senior A random encounter that could only be described as "fate" brought this cute New York couple and their dream dog, Susie, together.  After falling deeply in love with their "new" old dog, Stanton and his girlfriend Erin decided to make it their mission to  connect prospective adopters with senior dogs.

Today, Susie's Senior Dogs has over 144K Facebook followers in less than six weeks and has helped place over 30  "senior dogs"  in perfect homes!  To read more about the success stories from Susie's Senor Dogs click here!

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If you have considered adopting a senior dog, take a second to read the below "7 Benefits of Adopting a Senior Pooch".

1. Senior dogs at shelters need homes just as badly as younger dogs. Many older dogs were once owned and loved by someone. For whatever reason, they were given up and abandoned in a shelter and are in need of a home. Just like puppies and younger adoptable dogs, they make loyal and loving companions.

2. Adopting an older dog may save its life. Many people are quick to adopt puppies and younger dogs, often overlooking dogs over the age of five. Shelters are overcrowded and unfortunately, older dogs are among the first to be euthanized if they aren’t adopted in a timely manner. By adopting a senior dog, you are not only providing it with a better life but are also saving it from being put down.

3. Older dogs are not necessarily “problem dogs” as many tend to think. Senior dogs lose their homes for a variety of reasons, usually having nothing to do with their behavior or temperament, but more due to the fact that their owners are unable to keep them for reasons including: the novelty of owning a dog wearing off, allergies, death of a guardian, a new baby, loss of a job, a move, change in work schedule, and various other lifestyle changes. These dogs need homes just as badly as young adoptees do, and make wonderful household pets.

4. Older dogs usually come trained and understand at least basic commands. Most older dogs are potty-trained and have mastered the basic commands such as “sit,” “stay,” “come,” and “down.” Adopting an already-trained dog will save you a lot of time and energy that you’d normally have to dedicate towards training a young dog.

5. You can teach an old dog new tricks. Dogs can be trained at any age and older dogs are just as smart as younger ones. Older dogs have a greater attention span than a puppy, which make them easier to train.

6. Older dogs are calmer and less energetic than younger dogs. An adult dog has graduated from the puppy stage and has an established demeanor and temperament, which will give you an instant idea of how it will fit into your household. Older dogs have all their adult teeth and are out of the energetic puppy phase, which will result in less destruction to your home. Many of them do well with young children as they have a lower energy level and have possibly lived with them in their past homes.

7. Older dogs make instant companions. Unlike a puppy, which requires leash training, etc. an older dog is ready to accompany you on a long walk and already knows how to play fetch. An adult dog will make a great workout partner, a loyal companion, and a late night snuggle buddy. Read more: http://www.cesarsway.com/dog-care/senior-dog/7-Reasons-to-Adopt-a-Senior-Dog#ixzz2vsfAdNBS

Amazing Rescue Transformations & Wags and Walks Weekly Updates

HP As you can imagine, in the rescue world, we see hundreds of amazing transformations but this might top them all.  If you haven’t already seen this article circling around the web, please take a second to look at this EXTREME transformation that will make you look twice before judging dogs you see in the shelter. Full Photo Gallery Here

Want to see more? Here are some other transformations that will shock you - Buzzfeed: 16 Incredible Transformation Photos Of Shelter Dogsr

And last but not least, our very own Wags and Walks transformations!

before and after

WAGS & WALKS WEEKLY UPDATE

As of today, we have had 94 adoptions in 2014 and saved a total of 118 dogs (including 9 Pitbull puppies that were born yesterday!)  To see pictures of our newest Wags and Walks members, follow us on Facebook

Wags & Walks Foster Interview

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HOW DID YOU GET STARTED FOSTERING FOR WAGS AND WALKS?

My girlfriend, Emily, had been volunteering with Wags and Walks for a while, and had told Lesley about her love of big dogs. About 8 months ago, Wags and Walks rescued a beautiful Mastiff named Molly, and we were all set to foster her, but she got adopted before we even had a chance to take her home.

We were a little disappointed (especially Emily, who I think was secretly planning to adopt Molly), but now Lesley knew that we were ready and willing to foster dogs, so waited patiently for the next big dog in need. Imagine my surprise when Emily brought home our first foster -- a tiny 5 pound toy poodle named Alvin. At first, Emily thought that it was some kind of joke (she never saw herself with anything smaller than a 50 pound pooch), but a week later we had adopted him. We've been fostering ever since.

HOW MANY DOGS HAVE YOU FOSTERED, AND WHO WAS YOUR FAVORITE (WE WON'T TELL THE OTHERS!)?

We've fostered fourteen dog, which seems crazy since we've only been fostering for 8 months. Obviously Alvin was our favorit

e, but we also fell totally in love with a sweet pitbull puppy with an adorable overbite named Harlow. It was pretty hard to let her go when she got adopted, but she went to a great family who's crazy about her, and we've actually watched her when they're out of town.

photo 1 (1)

WHAT HAS BEEN THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE WITH FOSTERING?

There are the little challenges like working with untrained puppies, or tiring them out so that they'll go to sleep, but those really just come with puppy territory. In reality, the hardest part is definitely letting the dogs go when they get adopted.

HOW HAS FOSTERING AFFECTED YOU?

I never had pets growing up, and while I've always liked dogs, I've never really been a "dog person". After adopting Alvin, and fostering 13 other amazing dogs, I can safely say that's changed. My co-workers joke about me being the dog whisperer, because more often than not I've got at least two dogs following me around all day at the office. It's been a lot of fun not just getting to know our amazing fosters, but also meeting the people who adopt them, and connecting with others over our shared love of dogs.

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST SURPRISE ABOUT BEING A FOSTER PARENT?

How quickly we ended up adopting one of our fosters. We'd talked about adopting before we started fostering, but didn't know if we were ready, and certainly didn't expect to adopt the tiniest toy poodle, but when we met Alvin we just fell in love.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONE THINKING ABOUT FOSTERING?

Just do it! I think fostering is a great way to test the waters if you're thinking of adopting but aren't quite ready to make the commitment yet, and it's such an incredible gift to a rescue in need of a good home.

20 Essential Facts Dog Lovers Must Always Remember

Dogs are family

Let's face it.  Life is straight up hectic with a 40 hour work week, LA commute, grocery shopping, finding time to workout - the list goes on.   With all life's distractions, these life lessons are sometimes easy to forget but when you remember that you are your dog’s whole world, these 20 truths are unforgettable.

These 20 essential facts all dog lovers must always keep in mind were written by DogHeirs. These life lessons are sometimes easy to forget in our hectic lives, but when you remember that you are your dog’s whole world, these 20 truths are unforgettable.

1. Don’t ignore me for too long.

 I may only live for 10 to 15 years. It seems like forever when you’re away from me and it hurts my heart when I don’t know where you are.

2. Take me to new places to meet friendly people and animals.

I might be frightened of them at first, but if you hold my paw through these new experiences, I’ll learn to be more confident and trusting of others. I really do love to meet new friends.

Click through to read all 20 essential facts!

I'm Not a Monster...

Kellan the pit with his foster dad - who rescued who?

This article is so moving and worth the read! Reminds us of our very own Griffin and Bruno. See how Griffin and Bruno are doing now by following us on Wags and Walks Alumni Facebook page!

Article: http://imnotamonster.org/work/kellan-houston-tx/

Wags and Walks Alumni Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Wags-and-Walks-Alumni/171048449756992

This site also has great information about Breed Specific Legislation found here.

Pit-Lovers Stand Up Against Pasadena Councilman’s Efforts at BSL

On Monday, January 27th Wags & Walks rescue joined over 100 pit bull advocates at the City Council Meeting in Pasadena to oppose Councilman Steve Madison’s proposed mandatory spay/neuter ordinance for all pit bull or pit bull cross breeds in the city of Pasadena. This meeting proved to be both extremely upsetting and extremely inspirational. Madison serves on the Pasadena city council and has continued to speak out against pit bulls stating that they are an inherently dangerous breed and has defended his beliefs by comparing pit bulls to “fully automatic machine guns.” Because the state of California does not allow for state or city bans on specific breeds, Madison has clung to the only breed specific ordinance currently allowed under state law, the option to require certain breeds to be spayed or neutered. At the meeting Monday night, Madison claimed his proposal was in fact an effort to help reduce the number of euthanized pit bulls in the city, yet he could not contain his hatred of this breed and continued to quote unsubstantiated information he has found on pit bull hate websites. Through the efforts of Josh Liddy and his local pit bull advocacy organization SwayLove.org with over 11,000 followers, word spread about Madison and his ill-conceived plan. Pasadena residents, people from surrounding communities as well as state pit bull advocacy organizations like Pit Bulls Against Misinformation from Sacramento congregated to stand up for pit bulls and to speak out against Steve Madison’s ignorant propaganda. Despite the council meeting starting nearly an hour late and this proposal not coming up for discussion until nearly 10 PM, 58 people stayed to take the podium and speak passionately about this breed and how misguided Madison’s claims are. All of these speakers showed great passion and utilized hard data as well as personal experiences in an effort to reach Steve Madison, as well as his fellow council members. Unfortunately, true to self, Madison ignored most of these speeches or laughed inappropriately when people gave examples of how pit bulls had made positive impacts on their lives or when an example was given of how resilient and forgiving pit bulls rescued from dog fighting rings are. Though this proposal was tabled until July 14th when the council members will review an alternative proposal that would require all dog breeds to be spayed or neutered in Pasadena in addition to this proposal and though Steve Madison did not waiver from his soap box or give the pit bull community his attention or respect, a lot of good did come out of this night. Pit bull owners, advocates, members of the rescue community, AKC representatives and many others came together to stand up for an incredible and incredibly misunderstood breed. We filled the main room to standing room only as well as two additional over flow rooms to stand up for what we believe in and stayed until after midnight on a Monday night to show Madison that we will be heard and we will not back down. Not one person came to speak in support of his proposal. We were also given great respect from many of the other council members present that night including Councilman John Kennedy who gave his full attention all night, taking notes on many of the points made in our speeches and who made the only real effort to vote down this proposal that night. In his efforts to demonize pit bulls and to create breed specific legislation in his community, Councilman Steve Madison in fact helped further unite the pit bull community in LA County while further segregating himself from the rest of his council members. Wags & Walks was happy to have been a part of such an amazing group of people and we will continue to stand up for a breed that many of us in the rescue choose to have as our own personal pets.